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Throwing up


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#1 Brandon

 

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        Posted 23 January 2007 - 12:22 AM

Since I am a new lab owner everything that happens is a first time.

Tonight Hunter threw up. It was nearly his entire dinner. He were playing (not rough at all) about 2 hrs after i feed him when he stopped and his midsection started thrusting, i thought he had to go out, but as i moved to take him out he threw up.

I know that sometimes dogs do this, but is it normal? Could it have been something he ate? There werent any foreign objects in the throwup just his dinner. Is this something I should be worried about? he has not had any other odd things happen, he has been pooping normal and routinelyl. Whenever we are outside he always seems to munch on something, grass, hay, small twigs, and leaves...I never bother too much with it because he never seems to be eating things that he shouldnt, and that seems to be one of his ways of exploring the world. Should I stop allowing him to chew on any of that stuff? (It would be quite difficult as we live in an old farm house with lots of land and trees) but if I have to monitor him closer I will.

I am not too concerned, I am more curious. Is this something that happens often with your pups? Should I be more concerned?


By the way, I put up a new album with some pictures of him at 8 and 12weeks(a few which I snapped tonight). The ones from tonight are pretty lousy, but i just wanted to get something posted.
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#2 pam

 

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        Posted 23 January 2007 - 12:56 AM

In my experience, dogs throw up pretty easily--- I read somewhere this is because carnivores have a robust digestive system --- the best response to a pathogen is to get it out asap. Also, Griffin vomits when he gets motion sickness in the car.

I wouldn't worry about the odd upchuck, but do worry if your pup throws up repeatedly and can't keep anything down or seems lethargic. Then suspect foreign body or poisoning.
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#3 Brandon

 

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        Posted 23 January 2007 - 02:53 PM

Ok thats what i sort of figured. Thanks Pam


What do you guys think about the whole eating grass/twigs/leaves thing? Should I allow it? Do you guys allow your pups to just learn what not to eat or will they just eat everything and never learn?
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#4 IanWilkinson

 

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        Posted 23 January 2007 - 03:09 PM

QUOTE (Brandon @ Jan 23 2007, 07:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ok thats what i sort of figured. Thanks Pam
What do you guys think about the whole eating grass/twigs/leaves thing? Should I allow it? Do you guys allow your pups to just learn what not to eat or will they just eat everything and never learn?


Grass is generally ok. Phoebe used to chomp down on horse droppings - again, vet's advice is that it's just processed veg matter!

Now Phoebe still sometimes tests things she finds interesting on the beach by trying to eat them - small fish, crab claws, goodness knows what else. If I'm nearby I can get her to drop it - if I see her straight away. Sometimes it's just lip licking - and halitosis later on! Once I was walking her on the leash and I felt the merest, barely perceived pull. I looked down and Phoebe had a sherbet lollipop in her mouth, with the stick protruding at a jaunty angle! - She saw it, wanted it and lifted it without breaking stride!

I don't think flora will generally be harmful, unless you already know it's toxic - e.g. laburnum
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#5 Carolyne

 

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        Posted 23 January 2007 - 03:43 PM

Tessa has eaten grass all her life. When we're out, she goes by another name.... Daisy.
I was always told they eat grass to make themselves sick. Tessa must be immune to the stuff. She has brought it back up on a few occasions but only when I know something's up with her.
She vomited the other day.. no warning, no wimpering, just walked into the lounge and vomited right in front of me. She seemed absolutely fine though.
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#6 pam

 

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        Posted 23 January 2007 - 04:44 PM

Griffin has eaten mechanical pencils, two fingers from a leather glove (whole), sticks and twigs, swallowed a pork rib whole (that was a few days of diarrhea). Some things have either passed or been vomited up (the glove fingers he carried around for a few days ... ew). I've tried to stop him, because he doesn't seem to be developing any discernment to speak of. He ate a rubber barbell dog toy and the chunks were big enough that he vomited repeatedly for about 12 hours and did not look happy with himself.

He did eat some latex surgical gloves which came back out the way they went in kind of hard and shiny ... so I know not to leave those in my pocket ...

Unfortunately, unless the scavenged item causes them discomfort *right away* they won't connect the experience with the item. Dogs get into things and generally their stomachs are pretty robust. I had a small bichon frise swallow a rock she could neither regurgitate nor pass, and it had to be removed surgically. The vet who did it said they took a bra out of a lab's stomach --- they identified it prior to surgery because of the hooks smile.gif

Biodegradable matter will pass --- eventually. Unfortunately, bras and rocks, not so much!
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#7 violent_storm2000

 

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        Posted 23 January 2007 - 07:02 PM

Grass and other organic material normally will not hurt the pup Unless it is toxic in the first place. But Sticks can splinter and do damage to their throats. Keep in mind that I have never seen that happen only heard about it.

One thing you do need to remember is if you fertilize your lawn during the summer months then you need to keep them away from eating it.
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