Jump to content



Photo

3 year old lab...impossible to train??


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 TexasLab1212

 

    Puppy Black Lab

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, Texas
  • Interests:I love talking my lab Ace for walks (rather he walks me most of the time), working out, cooking, spending time with my husband, decorating my house.
 

        Posted 18 January 2007 - 04:10 PM

My husband and I recently adopted a 3 year old black lab from my step-brother. The dog is very sweet and looks to be pure bread. However he has a big problem with jumping on people (me especially) and chewing up everything in our backyard. He is also not housebroken and if given the chance to come inside he uses the restroom EVERYWHERE! Instantly he begins hiking his leg on furniture the second we let him in. I'm hoping somebody has some advice out there for me! Our training methods are not working all that well. He is not fixed and I'm wondering if that would solve a lot of our problems with him being so hyper. Any suggestions?
~TexasLab1212

#2 suzanne & harley

 

    Big Black Lab

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 687 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Dallas TX
  • Interests:Camping. Video games. Dog SCOUTS!
 

        Posted 18 January 2007 - 04:16 PM

I don't think "fixing" at this age is going to change all that much for you. Fixing before a dog reaches puberty can offset some behaviors. That window is gone.

Don't lose hope though. Three is definately not to old to train. It just can take a bit longer because your having to change learned behavior which is always more difficult than shaping behaviors before they are learned. I don't know what training technique you have attempted but if you haven't yet I urge you to get a good book on clicker training. Check out Karen Pryor. Check out www.clickertraining.com there are lots of good books there as well as articles on clicker training.
Suzanne & Harley DSA (Dog Scouts of America)

I can't do enough to make a difference for every dog in the world
But I can do all I know how to make a world of difference for for this dog

#3 TexasLab1212

 

    Puppy Black Lab

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, Texas
  • Interests:I love talking my lab Ace for walks (rather he walks me most of the time), working out, cooking, spending time with my husband, decorating my house.
 

        Posted 18 January 2007 - 04:18 PM

Thanks for the tip! I'll try that out.
~TexasLab1212

#4 ian

 

    Big Black Lab

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 396 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:England, Lincoln
  • Interests:I'm a staff nurse. I assist in the training and re homing of dogs.
 

        Posted 18 January 2007 - 04:32 PM

excersise, excersise and a little bit more excersise.
If it looks like it works and it feels like it works
Then it works

Mans best friend

#5 IanWilkinson

 

    Big Black Lab

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,095 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Northumberland, England
  • Interests:Black Labradors! - Dolphins! Music, Walking and the great outdoors, Golf, Ufology, Reading, Photography, Cooking, the study of life after death (don't know what 'ology' that would be!) I'm married to Sylvia with 2 grown up children and am a Station Officer in Fire and Rescue. I'm 54. I'm a 1956 Aston Martin. I'm (so people tell me) still looking very good for my vintage (all me own - mostly brown - hair, and my original teeth!!) - As a 1956 model I'm still quite sporty, but the bodywork has seen better days, the piston rings are a bit worn and the paint job is a little dull!!.
 

        Posted 18 January 2007 - 04:35 PM

QUOTE (ian @ Jan 18 2007, 09:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
excersise, excersise and a little bit more excersise.


and maybe just a little squint at the spellcheck...
...PHOEBE'S PET HUMAN

#6 Heather

 

    Big Black Lab

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 894 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Massachusetts
  • Interests:Black Lab's, Saabs, Kids, rescue dogs, Abyssinian cats, goldfish, reading, geek's geek, living in the wilderness,volvo's, fishes, camping, photography, art, music & writing eat up my time.
 

        Posted 18 January 2007 - 04:39 PM

There are several posts in this section.. of training. I have a three year old lab also.. She is unspayed (as of yet) and wasn't too hard to retrain..
-- Greetings from, Heather, Duke & Minnie !!
"Learning for all animals is a lifetime commitment. Just as education for humans does not end with a high school diploma or a college degree, so the graduation certificate after eight weeks of training class does not end Flash's brush with scholarship. Dogs learn constantly, but they may not be learning the things you planned to teach."
Norma Bennett Woolf --from a Dog Trainer's Guide


#7 suzanne & harley

 

    Big Black Lab

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 687 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Dallas TX
  • Interests:Camping. Video games. Dog SCOUTS!
 

        Posted 18 January 2007 - 05:35 PM

oh. I just tried to go to www.clickertraining.com and the site has disappeared!

There are others though www.clickersolutions.com www.dogpatch.org

Google clicker training and you'll find lots of info.

I sure hope the site is just down temporarily! I really liked clickertraining.com !!!
Suzanne & Harley DSA (Dog Scouts of America)

I can't do enough to make a difference for every dog in the world
But I can do all I know how to make a world of difference for for this dog

#8 ian

 

    Big Black Lab

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 396 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:England, Lincoln
  • Interests:I'm a staff nurse. I assist in the training and re homing of dogs.
 

        Posted 18 January 2007 - 07:19 PM

QUOTE (IanWilkinson @ Jan 18 2007, 04:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
and maybe just a little squint at the spellcheck...



I have been on nights. tongue.gif


*exercise*, I'm now questioning my own sanity.
If it looks like it works and it feels like it works
Then it works

Mans best friend

#9 violent_storm2000

 

    Big Black Lab

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 641 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Jacksonville, NC
 

        Posted 19 January 2007 - 02:23 PM

Exercise and Crate training can go a long way with any dog. The chewing thing is probably boredom. The jumping thing can be hard to break. For starters give the dog no attention when it is jumping. None at all. Bad attention is still attention. When you come home and the dog is excited jumping and shaking everywhere ignore it. Do not give any attention until the pup is completely calm and quiet. The house training thing just takes time. Google Crate training. That method has always worked best for me.
"War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things: the decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse."

Posted Image

#10 Stoven

 

    Puppy Black Lab

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Location:Redmond, OR
  • Interests:Hiking, Shooting, Outdoors, Camping, Photography, Computer Geek, and Video Games
 

        Posted 22 January 2007 - 10:14 PM

One thing I can suggest on the jumping up on people in the house and such is to leave the leash on the dog while in the house and when it come up to you step on the leash and when it tries to jump say "no" and keep your foot on the leash. Then when it stops jumping hug/pet/do what ever praise thing you do. Its an old Circus trick with the Elephants. They train them when they are little with a chain securely fastened to the ground when they are little and it learns when it has the chain on it can't go anywhere. When they get older all they have to do is put a chain on there foot and it makes them think they cant go anywhere. You can train your dog to not jump on you by making it think it "cant" jump on you. Doesn't mean that it won't stop jumping, just not on people.

Stephen

#11 sweber25

 

    Adult Black Lab

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
 

        Posted 26 March 2009 - 05:02 PM

All dogs need to be loved, loved, loved. If you have him outside he feels abandoned and I am sure you're not spending time with him that you should be. I can understand your frustration with an animal that is not house broken or fully completed his baby to adult teeth transition. He did not have enough things to chew on when he was going through this stage. Also, chewing on things is often a sign of dental pain in adult dogs because it helps to minimize the pain. Humans do the same thing, they apply pressure to the tooth that is hurting to minimize the pain. It's not healthy. You need to spend time with that dog and show him a lot of love.

After he has calmed down he needs some basic obedience training that will make both of your lives easier. House training is the key. He needs to be in a crate at all times when he is inside until he gets the idea that marking the inside is not acceptable. You will need to take him out every 20 to 30 minutes. I would suggest working on obedience training first so that you can control him. He needs to learn SIT, STAY, LEAVE IT, AND DOWN before you even attempt to house train him.

Also, training needs to be done with one person at a time. Both of you yelling at him and telling him what you want only confuses the dog. This can be accomplished with a lot of work. An outside dog that is separated from his family is almost always a pain in the ass.


#12 sweber25

 

    Adult Black Lab

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
 

        Posted 26 March 2009 - 05:11 PM

Having him fixed will settle him down quite a bit. He is marking because he is a male with all the "fixins". Also, with the jumping part, every time he jumps you need to turn your back to him and face the other way. That is something that labs especially take personally because you are showing him you do not accept that type of affection. After doing that a few times he should stop. Again, basic obedience training with food rewards will make a wonder of a difference. ONLY REWARD THE DOG IF HE COMPLETES HIS TASK. Start small. Expect him to do the task for 1 to 2 seconds and make it longer after that. The most important part of training a dog is to make it fun and brief. Dogs will lose interest if they feel you're making them work for their attention.


#13 aaronc

 

    Adult Black Lab

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
 

        Posted 19 April 2009 - 08:48 PM

QUOTE (suzanne & harley @ Jan 18 2007, 05:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't think "fixing" at this age is going to change all that much for you. Fixing before a dog reaches puberty can offset some behaviors. That window is gone.

Don't lose hope though. Three is definately not to old to train. It just can take a bit longer because your having to change learned behavior which is always more difficult than shaping behaviors before they are learned. I don't know what training technique you have attempted but if you haven't yet I urge you to get a good book on clicker training. Check out Karen Pryor. Check out www.clickertraining.com there are lots of good books there as well as articles on clicker training.



I'm not sure if it was just a placebo effect or whatever, but I had my 2yr old lab fixed when I got him @ 2 years old and I noticed a definite change in behavior. He marked a lot less, became a lot less aggressive, and just generally calmed down a lot. Not to mention the humping stopped almost immediately.

#14 Zoe

 

    Senior Black Lab

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington State
 

        Posted 05 June 2010 - 05:38 AM

The key is to watch the dog ALL THE TIME, and to constantly "mark and reward" when the dog is doing what you want, and not just correct when s/he is doing something "wrong".

If you just put in the effort, in a few weeks the dog will learn that the best (and only) way to get your attention is to sit in front of you, keep all four paws on the ground, etc..... It's amazing the difference when you give a big open-mouthed "doggy smile" when you notice the dog behaving well (Of course, a doggy smile and a treat is even better, from the lab's point of view!!)

You'll know you are on the right track when you catch yourself unconsciously "touch-rewarding" your dog almost constantly....

95% of all "dog training" is PEOPLE training!!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users