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Pulling on leash


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#1 beiberblack

 

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        Posted 10 July 2011 - 02:40 AM

My 10month old lab pulls on the leash, mainly when she sees other dogs and or people, she thinks everyone loves her and wants to play!! I have tried the rope type slip leash, the body harness type (works ok) and now the halti collar. She has chewed the safety strap already on the halti!! She is lucky and we live in countryside and she has plenty of off leash walking but can be a tough walk when we want to go down to school for pick up time!! Any tips to help train her please??

#2 mama2elvis

 

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        Posted 10 July 2011 - 10:29 AM

I had the same problem with my 15 month old. I had tried all the same things you did. I finally had to resoort to pinch collar. It was the best $30.00 I ever spent. He is a totally different dog on the leash now. Makes walking him enjoyable.

#3 Kurt

 

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        Posted 10 July 2011 - 01:45 PM

Even though many people think they are cruel, a pinch collar (or spike collar) is not that bad on a dog. On regular chain choke collars when you pull on the leash, the front of the dogs neck gets the brunt of the force. This can cause neck injury to the dog. The pinch or spike collars don't do this. When you pull on the lease the pulling force is equally distributed around the dogs neck.

I prefer the gentle leader type of collar. The dog always goes where the nose is pointed and if the dog pulls, the nose is pulled sideways where the dog doesn't want to go. They quickly learn that if they want to move forward they can't pull you on the leash.

I also found a tip that worked for me. When the dog is pulling, use your left foot and just very slightly tap the dogs rear right foot inward. This will cause the dog to loose the synch of the walk and he'll stop pulling in order to get the walking rhythm back.

And lastly, remember that the leash should have a droop in it while walking and if your dog pulls it's a gentle pull and release. If you keep pressure on the leash at all times the dog will ignore you. Remember a pull is a command, not an walking environment.

#4 gasjr4wd

 

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        Posted 12 July 2011 - 04:26 AM

What everyone else has said has been spot on.
They are for training only, a quick snap then loose.
I would just like to add: have you thought about what other breeds/animals use a harness? Sled dogs, horses, etc. Why? It's easy for them to pull. I have no idea why they even sell harnesses. As for the chewing on the lead, that must stop. It's a safety issue.

#5 Kurt

 

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        Posted 12 July 2011 - 10:06 AM


Gasjr4wd:

I agree with you totally about the harnesses. I can never seem to get good control of a dog that's wearing one. I think of a harness as something to use to turn your dog into a suitcase.

And remember that you won't see results overnight. It takes time, sometimes several weeks before it finally settles in the dogs mind. Be patient and consistent with your training.

#6 Jenic

 

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        Posted 13 July 2011 - 09:12 PM

Our puppy is 6 months old and we have been working on pulling on his leash since he was 4 months he is getting better but at the beginning of his walk he pulls more, once we get in to it he gets better. Just keep working with you pup following the suggestions and he will get better.

#7 Pinklu

 

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        Posted 26 July 2011 - 04:35 PM

As soon as my dog puts tension on the leash I stop walking. It will take a while but eventually he will look back at you to see why you arent moving. Then call him because he's probably still at the end of the leash. And he will come to your side then praise him or click him or give treats or whatever it takes and then carry on. What also helps is practising by walking back and forth. As soon as the dog pulls, stop, turn around and give a small tug and walk in a different direction. They will get super annoyed. But then they will get used to paying more attention.

We taught our dog to heel by having two people walk in front of him and force him to walk behind with the leash very short in between us so he can't come around, or come between us. We did this for several weeks. Then we tried it offleash and he did it immediately! He just seemed thrilled to not have the leash there.

#8 millie12

 

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        Posted 27 July 2011 - 09:31 AM

Hi,

Have you tried holding treats in ur hand when you go out on lead walks. All you have to do is let your dog smell them and everytime they walk by your side say the word heal. Everytime you do this give them a treat and over a few days take less treats out but keep saying heal. That way when you take no treats out the dog should just walk by your side when you say heal.

This is the same for when you walk past people teach the dog to sit until they have passed by and when the dog does it give them a treat.

#9 mike hall

 

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        Posted 27 July 2011 - 09:40 AM

Hi,

Have you tried holding treats in ur hand when you go out on lead walks. All you have to do is let your dog smell them and everytime they walk by your side say the word heal. Everytime you do this give them a treat and over a few days take less treats out but keep saying heal. That way when you take no treats out the dog should just walk by your side when you say heal.

This is the same for when you walk past people teach the dog to sit until they have passed by and when the dog does it give them a treat.

This idea really works.




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