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Trimming Rufus' nails


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#1 Jerry Smith

 

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        Posted 27 January 2010 - 12:17 AM

How do I go about trimming his nails, I have one of those little sanders like they show on TV, but willing to buy a good set of trimmers for him. I thought I would start with the little sander and work my way up.

BTW a couple places have those drum sanders on sale for $3.00

Thanks,

Jerry

#2 Kurt

 

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        Posted 27 January 2010 - 05:54 AM

The best nail cutters I have used are those large ones that look like a large pair of pliers. They cut the nail easily.
The ones I don't like for labs are those small silver jobs with the little slide wire in them. They seem fine on toy dogs, but they seem to hurt large dogs.
Introduce your dog to nail cutting slowly by just handling their feet when they are young. Act like you are going to cut their nails, but don't. It'll get them accustomed to having their nails clipped later.

I just use my Dremel with a sanding wheel on it to give the just clipped nail a soft end. It just takes a second to do it.

#3 ChuckB

 

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        Posted 27 January 2010 - 08:13 AM

I agree with Kurt. I used both on Luke, the ones with the black handle that have the little guide and look like pliers worked the best. There were still misses and occasionally I would make him bleed. For Mace I got one of these high performance ones that is suppose to shoot some lazer into the nail and a light is suppose to turn from red to yellow to green when it's safe to cut the nail. I haven't tried it yet. Took Mace in for his 1st checkup and the vet did a complementary nail clipping. I think I paid $45.00 for it at PetSmart --> http://www.thegreenh...ail-clipper.php

#4 Jerry Smith

 

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        Posted 27 January 2010 - 10:06 AM

I am looking to see if Pet Supply Plus has those trimmers. The good ones look to be about $80, worth it if they work.

Thanks,

Jerry

#5 Jerry Smith

 

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        Posted 27 January 2010 - 10:18 AM

I have another question about trimming Rufus' nails, how do I get him to cooperate?

Jerry

#6 Kurt

 

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        Posted 28 January 2010 - 04:03 AM

Start off slow and clip just one ot two nails at a time. Give your dog a treat immediately after you trim a few. Then wait a few hours or until the next day, trim a nail or two then offer a treat immediately afterwards. In no time they will associate nail trimming with getting a treat and you won't have any more "jiggly" dog while trimming the nails.
This technique also works on dogs who don't like to be brushed too.

#7 Kurt

 

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        Posted 28 January 2010 - 04:11 AM

Try as often as we can to be careful, we sometimes do hit a quick on our dogs. It's not that hard to do when you have black nails. Hey, that laser nail cutter looks really great. I wonder if it works as advertised?
When we do hit a quick, we put dry cornstarch on the nail tip. Stops the bleeding within 30 seconds.

Just a tip for those who haven't heard this before, but if you have a dog with really long nails, don't try to cut them to size in one sitting. You are sure to make them bleed. Just cut the nails a little bit, wait a week-10 days then cut some more. Repeat until the nail is normal length. What happens is that as you trim the nail the quick (or blood filled vein in the nail) retracts. Our neighbor once had a dog that came from a rescue group with very long nails. They had their vet trim the nails. The vet trimmed the nails from very long to very short in one session. That dog really never let people touch its feet again for years. It took a lot of patience and training to get the dog comfortable with having its nails trimmed again.

#8 ChuckB

 

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        Posted 28 January 2010 - 03:31 PM

I'm thinking that I'm not as patient as Kurt. I'm hopeful that the laser deal will actually work. Luke & I would have wrestling matches to get his nails clipped. When I missed I felt horrible. This weekend will tell the tale.



#9 Jerry Smith

 

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        Posted 28 January 2010 - 04:56 PM

I just want to get the sharp part of his nails ground down.

I am looking into one of the laser guided clippers.

Thanks,

Jerry

#10 Kurt

 

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        Posted 30 January 2010 - 05:24 PM

If the nails are already the length you want them but just sharp, just use a Dremel sanding wheel on them. It only takes a second or two and the result is that the end of the nail is as smooth as a polished stone.

How do you know if your dogs nails are the right length?
On a hard floor (tile or wood) look at your dogs nails. Is the nail touching the floor? Does the nail bend to one side or another due to contact with the floor? If so your dogs nails need to be trimmed. The nails should be just a hair or two off the flooring surface.

#11 ChuckB

 

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        Posted 31 January 2010 - 08:25 AM

Well here's the deal on the high performance laser quick finder - NG on a 4 - 5 month old. His nails are just too small. I think it may work once he grows but NG for now. I was able to use it to snip the ends off. He was pretty good about it. Just snipped the very ends off - I think I'll work him into nail clipping that way.



#12 Doug and Mary

 

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        Posted 01 February 2010 - 10:41 AM

Hi all

Whilst there have been a lot of posts about trimming and clipping nails, there has been nothing about the angle the nail should be clipped or ground.

Doing nails at the correct angle is critical to the well being of the dog and stops things like flaking, hollow nail, lameness and other conditions that can be caused by broken or incorrect nail care.

To this end, have done a diagram highlighting the correct angle a dog's nail should be trimmed or ground.

Posted Image

Doug and Mary
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#13 Kurt

 

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        Posted 03 February 2010 - 12:41 AM

Thanks for posting that graphic of a dogs foot. Pictures always speak a thousand words!
Yes the angle is important. I always trim so that the nail is flat to the floor.

#14 Doug and Mary

 

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        Posted 03 February 2010 - 06:48 AM

Thanks for posting that graphic of a dogs foot. Pictures always speak a thousand words!
Yes the angle is important. I always trim so that the nail is flat to the floor.


Hi

It works out about the same, when the foot is in the vertical position the toe rotates slightly forward, with the pad slightly compressed as a result of the dogs weight.

Doug & Mary
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