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#1 SteveSimkiss2

 

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        Posted 27 December 2006 - 03:38 PM

I have a black lab, he just turned 3. Over the last 18 months, he has developed ear issues that dont seem to be cured in the long run by any medications. He shakes his head all day, has a bad smell coming from his ears, and is just constantly bothered by them. I have been to 3 different vets, and all have done cultures, and have prescribed antibiotics, and they work for a few weeks after the last pills are taken, but it seems to come back just as quickly as it went away. I have also tried non prescription ear cleaners, with no long term luck. He is not near any signifigant water, so i dont think thats the problem. Has anyone had the same experience? Its so hard to watch such a well mannered and fun dog be so bothered by his ears, its painful to watch. Help!

#2 KarenM

 

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        Posted 27 December 2006 - 04:07 PM

I found this and thought it might help. I would do some further research. Hope you find some help for him. sorry I could not be of more help. Maybe some others here will have some ideas.


"It is usually necessary to have a referral to see a specialist at one of the veterinary schools. Most vets
are willing to make referrals, but sometimes it is a touchy subject.

Most cases of persistent ear infections are due to some underlying cause. The most common of
these is atopy, or inhalant allergies. This is also the most frustrating underlying cause, because it is a
lifelong problem that won't go away and which can be difficult to control.

There are two approaches to allergic otitis. The first is to treat just the ear problem, whenever it is
necessary. The second is to treat the underlying allergy problem in an effort to make the ear problem
go away. I prefer the second approach but have a hard time convincing my clients to go for it due to
expense and the difficulty involved in treating allergies.

To diagnose atopy, intradermal skin testing or blood testing for allergens is necessary. Skin testing
works better. These tests identify the things the dog is allergic to. Then a solution of very small
amounts of these allergens is made, which is used as an injection to "hyposensitize" the dog to the
allergens, hopefully stopping the reaction to them. Allergy testing and hyposensitizing works between
60 and 80% of the time, with blood testing producing results in the lower range and skin testing in
the upper range. We have had at least three or four patients whose ear infections were totally
controlled through hyposensitization, so it does work really well, sometimes.

The other approach is to treat the ear problems whenever it is necessary. We usually use
combination products containing an antibiotic, a corticosteroid and an antifungal agent, such as
Otomax (Rx) or MalOtic (Rx). It is perfectly acceptable to do a smear of the ear's contents and try
to determine if an antibiotic or antifungal agent is better. Ear cultures are not very helpful in
determining what topical product to use, in my opinion, because most of the products contain the
same ingredients. However, cultures can be really useful for selecting an appropriate oral antibiotic
to use in conjuction with the topical product, when that seems necessary. Good ear cleaning can
help a great deal in preventing ear infections from recurring.

I like to do some maintenance between infections, too. I think that rinsing the ears with vinegar
mixed half and half with water once or twice a week helps a lot in controlling recurrent ear infections.
While we do not routinely recommend it, some vets feel strongly that the ear should be rinsed out
after using this solution. Antihistamines, particularly clemastine (Tavist D tm) seem to help some
dogs, as do essential fatty acid supplements such as 3V caps ™ or OmegaDerm ™.

There are other possible underlying causes, such as hypothyroidism and immune system disorders.
Trying to rule these out, especially if there atopy doesn't seem to be the problem, is also worthwhile.

Mike Richards, DVM
8/10/2000 "


....................clean the dog's ears on a regular basis, such as once or
twice a week, with dilute vinegar solution (1 part vinegar, 1 or 2 parts water) by rinsing the ear out
with the solution and then rinsing the ears a final time with plain water. This helps to prevent
secondary infections but doesn't always make the ears comfortable. For this, we try antihistamines to
see if they will help. I like to start with clemastine (Tavist or Tavist D Rx). We combine this with
topical treatment. I like the ointments that contain gentocin and a corticosteroid, such as Otomax Rx
or MalOtic Rx but we have had success with other products, too. Zymox Rx has worked in a few
dogs in which the other ointments weren't helpful. Finally, corticosteroids will usually provide enough
relief to suppress infections but due to the potential for side effects we try to keep oral
corticosteroids as a last resort. To put this in perspective, we probably use corticosteroids in several
hundred patients a year -- so it is a common last resort.
....................Mike Richards, DVM
8/4/2000


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#3 Heather

 

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        Posted 27 December 2006 - 04:15 PM

Hate to really hate to beat a dead horse.. But a large percentage of all health problems with dogs can sometimes be related to the food they eat. I am not a Veterinarian, however.

I would think something chronic like this.. would be able to be alleviated by surgery.. all vet's usually would prescribe something like this.. even if only to try it and see... ????? It's a money maker anyway.. Maybe a Holistic Vet would be someone to see.. See what they prescribe.

I know my (human) cousin as a baby had chronic ear infections even tho she was a breastfed infant. She saw a chiropractor and he did some mumbo jumbo on her head.. adjusted (gently) and she was Perfect never had another one as far as I know. I know her chronic problem was fixed.


Sometimes MEDICATION is not the answer.. We as a society in general medicate medicate medicate.. if there is a problem out there we make a medicine to *fix* it. I can't tell you how many medications my bil has been on to fix his *problems* Some people are not fixable.. some are just and because young people might be present : Jerks.. In the case of my husbands grandfather.. he was on so many medications.. that they were killing him. He almost died because they overmedicated him...he kept coming up with problems.. that they were medicating for.. and not looking at him.. they were medicating his side effects.. seriously not kidding. I am using this just to illustrate my point. Dog's and humans are very different physically speaking..


I would *prescribe* seeing a Holistic vet or even before that.. trying a Holistic or natural food. Whichever is cheaper.. try that and go from there.. Wonder if the dog is making too much earwax.. and it's getting infected? Cause there is too much.. ?? This is sometimes the reason..

There is a Online veterinarian. You can pay him $30 bucks.. I think.. and he will go over your case files.. and take a look (over the internet.. not in his office) But as you have seen 3 vets locally.. I don't think he could help you much.

I swear Holistic is the answer.. Organic foods, natural soap, .. it's all making a comeback.. because the science to support it is there.. it's better for us and for our pets.

I wish you good luck.. Heather smile.gif

forgot to mention .. My former boss had a golden retriever that had constant hot spots. He was fed science diet food. Large breed adult. I know someone here told me Science diet failed some sort of dog food test..

I'm pretty certain now in hindsight.. the science diet was the cause.. How could it be not.. The dog didn't put on any perfumes..or creams.. or eat anything but the food.. so.. food is likely the problem.. in his case.. Karen also had some good ideas that she found..
-- Greetings from, Heather, Duke & Minnie !!
"Learning for all animals is a lifetime commitment. Just as education for humans does not end with a high school diploma or a college degree, so the graduation certificate after eight weeks of training class does not end Flash's brush with scholarship. Dogs learn constantly, but they may not be learning the things you planned to teach."
Norma Bennett Woolf --from a Dog Trainer's Guide


#4 black_knight

 

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        Posted 28 December 2006 - 12:31 AM

QUOTE (Heather @ Dec 27 2006, 01:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hate to really hate to beat a dead horse.. But a large percentage of all health problems with dogs can sometimes be related to the food they eat. I am not a Veterinarian, however.

I would think something chronic like this.. would be able to be alleviated by surgery.. all vet's usually would prescribe something like this.. even if only to try it and see... ????? It's a money maker anyway.. Maybe a Holistic Vet would be someone to see.. See what they prescribe.

I know my (human) cousin as a baby had chronic ear infections even tho she was a breastfed infant. She saw a chiropractor and he did some mumbo jumbo on her head.. adjusted (gently) and she was Perfect never had another one as far as I know. I know her chronic problem was fixed.


Sometimes MEDICATION is not the answer.. We as a society in general medicate medicate medicate.. if there is a problem out there we make a medicine to *fix* it. I can't tell you how many medications my bil has been on to fix his *problems* Some people are not fixable.. some are just and because young people might be present : Jerks.. In the case of my husbands grandfather.. he was on so many medications.. that they were killing him. He almost died because they overmedicated him...he kept coming up with problems.. that they were medicating for.. and not looking at him.. they were medicating his side effects.. seriously not kidding. I am using this just to illustrate my point. Dog's and humans are very different physically speaking..


I would *prescribe* seeing a Holistic vet or even before that.. trying a Holistic or natural food. Whichever is cheaper.. try that and go from there.. Wonder if the dog is making too much earwax.. and it's getting infected? Cause there is too much.. ?? This is sometimes the reason..

There is a Online veterinarian. You can pay him $30 bucks.. I think.. and he will go over your case files.. and take a look (over the internet.. not in his office) But as you have seen 3 vets locally.. I don't think he could help you much.

I swear Holistic is the answer.. Organic foods, natural soap, .. it's all making a comeback.. because the science to support it is there.. it's better for us and for our pets.

I wish you good luck.. Heather smile.gif

forgot to mention .. My former boss had a golden retriever that had constant hot spots. He was fed science diet food. Large breed adult. I know someone here told me Science diet failed some sort of dog food test..

I'm pretty certain now in hindsight.. the science diet was the cause.. How could it be not.. The dog didn't put on any perfumes..or creams.. or eat anything but the food.. so.. food is likely the problem.. in his case.. Karen also had some good ideas that she found..




The allergies to the food may be part of the cause with ear infections that just won't go away. Jed who is 4 yrs old has been prone to many bouts of infections. We are constantly having to clean his ears 2-3 times a week with Epi-optic solution. He has the shaking of his head and smelly ears. He loves to swim during the warmer months, but even now recently he has not had the opportunity to go in the water, and he still has problems with his ears. That is what makes me think that the brand of food I am feeding him is causing some kind of allergic reaction. I have to take him in to the vet tomorrow for his annual shots and routine check. Having his ears checked, are one of the concerns I will have the vet examine. And I have also heard that some dogs are more prone to ear infections than others. sad.gif
Eileen & Jed

We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. Itís the best deal man has ever made.
-M. Acklam


#5 carpslab

 

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        Posted 28 December 2006 - 07:08 AM

Have you tried daily ear cleanings? If you suspect an alergen, then start removing the possibilties. IF you think maybe the food then that's easy enough to change.

#6 black_knight

 

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        Posted 14 January 2007 - 11:13 PM

Ear infections shouldn't be taken too lightly. They cause a pet a great deal of discomfort. The pain is agonizing from the symtoms.
Jed was diagnosed with ear infection in both his ears 2 weeks ago. He has been to the vet to have his ears cleaned and flushed. I have to give him antibiotics 2X a day (which he is very good taking it, added to his food) biggrin.gif , and also have to administer ear drops 2X a day. All this continues for 1 month and then I will take him back for a follow up to see how things are. the vet told me that this is a no guarantee cure all.

This is something that we will have to deal with him always. We have always cleaned out his ears on a regular basis, using Epi Otic ear cleaner. Somehow that wasn't a preventive.The swab test results showed he had 4 different bacteria bugs in both ears. sad.gif Related to swimming and diving. Water left in the ear canal where it is warm makes for a great enviroment for bacteria to grow. Luckily though this was caught in time and there is no damage done to his ear drums. He never showed any signs of having pain, (except when his ears were swabbed) and just a lot of head shaking and smelly ears. That has now subsided and hopefully the vet will have good news that the infection has cleared. We will have to to be more careful in the future. In a few months when the weather is warmer, trying to keep him out of the water is going to be impossible. Too bad they didn't make ear plugs for swimming dogs.
Eileen & Jed

We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. Itís the best deal man has ever made.
-M. Acklam


#7 Heather

 

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        Posted 15 January 2007 - 10:43 AM

They do make prescription earplugs for people that are all squishy & soft (like clay) and form to the ear it is put in.. they also have an earband that you wear around the head...to keep the water out.;. wonder if you could get some fabric and fashion something similiar..like a headband with velcro under the chin.. ??
I would have thought that the epi stuff would be a preventative.. what about hydrogen peroxide?? isn't that a disinfectant? This has got to be lucrative for the vets... I would think eventually the antibiotics aren't going to work on him.. and will probably be when they are needed really badly.
-- Greetings from, Heather, Duke & Minnie !!
"Learning for all animals is a lifetime commitment. Just as education for humans does not end with a high school diploma or a college degree, so the graduation certificate after eight weeks of training class does not end Flash's brush with scholarship. Dogs learn constantly, but they may not be learning the things you planned to teach."
Norma Bennett Woolf --from a Dog Trainer's Guide


#8 mzfryz

 

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        Posted 10 February 2007 - 10:00 PM

QUOTE (SteveSimkiss2 @ Dec 27 2006, 02:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have a black lab, he just turned 3. Over the last 18 months, he has developed ear issues that dont seem to be cured in the long run by any medications. He shakes his head all day, has a bad smell coming from his ears, and is just constantly bothered by them. I have been to 3 different vets, and all have done cultures, and have prescribed antibiotics, and they work for a few weeks after the last pills are taken, but it seems to come back just as quickly as it went away. I have also tried non prescription ear cleaners, with no long term luck. He is not near any signifigant water, so i dont think thats the problem. Has anyone had the same experience? Its so hard to watch such a well mannered and fun dog be so bothered by his ears, its painful to watch. Help!



I have a black lab who is also bothered with ear problems. The first sign of a problem is the shaking of their head (but you know that already) and the smell is the second clue. Since this is my 2nd black lab, I have learned that it is necessary to clean their ears with rubbing alcohol after swimming - hunting - bathing - whenever they might get their ears wet. I have a spray bottle specifically for tha purpose. I haven't had to treat their ears with pills, just drops. I also try to make sure her ears are always clean, which is a little difficult with her - she is a hard player~
QUOTE
Good luck!

#9 Heather

 

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        Posted 10 February 2007 - 11:23 PM

Speaking of this ear cleaning thing.. how does everyone clean them? Just use q-tips? I just cleaned my dog's ears the other day.. they both seemed to be ok with me doing it. Didn't mind it much. They seemed to enjoy it.. I have been giving the dogs the full body massages.. for a month now.. and getting them used to me touching them all over.. this way they don't mind me checking them out all over and can touch ears and such to make sure all is good.. I found a lump of scar tissue on Sadie's leg.. now I know to bring it up to my vet next visit.
Anyway back to the ears.. The stuff was blacker than black.. I used q-tips and tried to get every nook and cranny.. without going into where the ear drum is.. I notice my dog shaking his head from time to time.. not sure if it's the ears.. bugging him or if it's the collar jingling noises.. from his tags.. he seems to stop shaking his head when the collar rights itself.. and the tags are down in front.. maybe he likes it there better..
-- Greetings from, Heather, Duke & Minnie !!
"Learning for all animals is a lifetime commitment. Just as education for humans does not end with a high school diploma or a college degree, so the graduation certificate after eight weeks of training class does not end Flash's brush with scholarship. Dogs learn constantly, but they may not be learning the things you planned to teach."
Norma Bennett Woolf --from a Dog Trainer's Guide


#10 black_knight

 

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        Posted 11 February 2007 - 02:35 AM

QUOTE (Heather @ Feb 10 2007, 08:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Speaking of this ear cleaning thing.. how does everyone clean them? Just use q-tips? I just cleaned my dog's ears the other day.. they both seemed to be ok with me doing it. Didn't mind it much. They seemed to enjoy it.. I have been giving the dogs the full body massages.. for a month now.. and getting them used to me touching them all over.. this way they don't mind me checking them out all over and can touch ears and such to make sure all is good.. I found a lump of scar tissue on Sadie's leg.. now I know to bring it up to my vet next visit.
Anyway back to the ears.. The stuff was blacker than black.. I used q-tips and tried to get every nook and cranny.. without going into where the ear drum is.. I notice my dog shaking his head from time to time.. not sure if it's the ears.. bugging him or if it's the collar jingling noises.. from his tags.. he seems to stop shaking his head when the collar rights itself.. and the tags are down in front.. maybe he likes it there better..


Cleaning dogs ears requires a bit of care. From what my vet has told me, when cleaning the best method is to apply the drops or solution into the ear and massage a few seconds and take a piece of soft cloth (cotton or terry cloth) that has been moistened with the ear solution, wrap the cloth around your index finger and start by gently wiping the outer part of the inside of the ear, followed by wiping the outer ear canal opening, making sure that you go no further than the first bend of you fingertip. He recommended not using Q-tips at all. Due to the fact more serious damage can be done to your pets ears because the shape of their ear canal is more L-shaped narrowing closer to the eardrum.

Jed is in the last stages of recovering from an infection. But now that he has had one bout he is prone to get more. We will have to be careful especially if he swims . A site you may want to check out is http://www.purinaone...cleNumber=30007
Eileen & Jed

We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. Itís the best deal man has ever made.
-M. Acklam


#11 Boris

 

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        Posted 12 February 2007 - 06:52 AM

The first labrador I had suffered off and on all his life with ear problems. Like you vets never seemed to be able to really get to the bottom of the problem (same with my second labs tendancy to get runny eyes). In both cases I found that rigourous hygene served better than antibiotics. Also it is worth using a clothes peg to peg the dogs ears up to allow better air circulation into the ear canal.

#12 Ladyharley

 

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        Posted 29 April 2008 - 06:55 PM

QUOTE (SteveSimkiss2 @ Dec 27 2006, 03:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have a black lab, he just turned 3. Over the last 18 months, he has developed ear issues that dont seem to be cured in the long run by any medications. He shakes his head all day, has a bad smell coming from his ears, and is just constantly bothered by them. I have been to 3 different vets, and all have done cultures, and have prescribed antibiotics, and they work for a few weeks after the last pills are taken, but it seems to come back just as quickly as it went away. I have also tried non prescription ear cleaners, with no long term luck. He is not near any signifigant water, so i dont think thats the problem. Has anyone had the same experience? Its so hard to watch such a well mannered and fun dog be so bothered by his ears, its painful to watch. Help!


Actually my vet said that labs were prone to "yeast" infections and there is a smell when you smell their ears...I read the ingredients on the ear cleanser she gave me and it's the same thing in the product you buy for female yeast infections.
miconazole3 nitrate 2% exactly. So now I use the baby wipes with antibacterial in it to wipe out my labs ears in the evening and once a week mix the miconazole with water and put a few drops in their ears...and voila...less expense than what the vet charges! no more ear infections! I get the generic equate brand at Walmart

#13 Ladyharley

 

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        Posted 29 April 2008 - 06:59 PM

QUOTE (KarenM @ Dec 27 2006, 04:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I found this and thought it might help. I would do some further research. Hope you find some help for him. sorry I could not be of more help. Maybe some others here will have some ideas.


"It is usually necessary to have a referral to see a specialist at one of the veterinary schools. Most vets
are willing to make referrals, but sometimes it is a touchy subject.

Most cases of persistent ear infections are due to some underlying cause. The most common of
these is atopy, or inhalant allergies. This is also the most frustrating underlying cause, because it is a
lifelong problem that won't go away and which can be difficult to control.

There are two approaches to allergic otitis. The first is to treat just the ear problem, whenever it is
necessary. The second is to treat the underlying allergy problem in an effort to make the ear problem
go away. I prefer the second approach but have a hard time convincing my clients to go for it due to
expense and the difficulty involved in treating allergies.

To diagnose atopy, intradermal skin testing or blood testing for allergens is necessary. Skin testing
works better. These tests identify the things the dog is allergic to. Then a solution of very small
amounts of these allergens is made, which is used as an injection to "hyposensitize" the dog to the
allergens, hopefully stopping the reaction to them. Allergy testing and hyposensitizing works between
60 and 80% of the time, with blood testing producing results in the lower range and skin testing in
the upper range. We have had at least three or four patients whose ear infections were totally
controlled through hyposensitization, so it does work really well, sometimes.

The other approach is to treat the ear problems whenever it is necessary. We usually use
combination products containing an antibiotic, a corticosteroid and an antifungal agent, such as
Otomax (Rx) or MalOtic (Rx). It is perfectly acceptable to do a smear of the ear's contents and try
to determine if an antibiotic or antifungal agent is better. Ear cultures are not very helpful in
determining what topical product to use, in my opinion, because most of the products contain the
same ingredients. However, cultures can be really useful for selecting an appropriate oral antibiotic
to use in conjuction with the topical product, when that seems necessary. Good ear cleaning can
help a great deal in preventing ear infections from recurring.

I like to do some maintenance between infections, too. I think that rinsing the ears with vinegar
mixed half and half with water once or twice a week helps a lot in controlling recurrent ear infections.
While we do not routinely recommend it, some vets feel strongly that the ear should be rinsed out
after using this solution. Antihistamines, particularly clemastine (Tavist D tm) seem to help some
dogs, as do essential fatty acid supplements such as 3V caps ™ or OmegaDerm ™.

There are other possible underlying causes, such as hypothyroidism and immune system disorders.
Trying to rule these out, especially if there atopy doesn't seem to be the problem, is also worthwhile.

Mike Richards, DVM
8/10/2000 "


....................clean the dog's ears on a regular basis, such as once or
twice a week, with dilute vinegar solution (1 part vinegar, 1 or 2 parts water) by rinsing the ear out
with the solution and then rinsing the ears a final time with plain water. This helps to prevent
secondary infections but doesn't always make the ears comfortable. For this, we try antihistamines to
see if they will help. I like to start with clemastine (Tavist or Tavist D Rx). We combine this with
topical treatment. I like the ointments that contain gentocin and a corticosteroid, such as Otomax Rx
or MalOtic Rx but we have had success with other products, too. Zymox Rx has worked in a few
dogs in which the other ointments weren't helpful. Finally, corticosteroids will usually provide enough
relief to suppress infections but due to the potential for side effects we try to keep oral
corticosteroids as a last resort. To put this in perspective, we probably use corticosteroids in several
hundred patients a year -- so it is a common last resort.
....................Mike Richards, DVM
8/4/2000

Antibacterial baby wipes are better cleaners and mantenance...and what I mentioned below.


http://www.vetinfo.c...c...blem in Lab



#14 susieq8163

 

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        Posted 16 February 2009 - 12:13 AM

QUOTE (SteveSimkiss2 @ Dec 27 2006, 03:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have a black lab, he just turned 3. Over the last 18 months, he has developed ear issues that dont seem to be cured in the long run by any medications. He shakes his head all day, has a bad smell coming from his ears, and is just constantly bothered by them. I have been to 3 different vets, and all have done cultures, and have prescribed antibiotics, and they work for a few weeks after the last pills are taken, but it seems to come back just as quickly as it went away. I have also tried non prescription ear cleaners, with no long term luck. He is not near any signifigant water, so i dont think thats the problem. Has anyone had the same experience? Its so hard to watch such a well mannered and fun dog be so bothered by his ears, its painful to watch. Help!

signs of allergies to food are, ear infection that keep coming back, itching, greasey fur, licking paws change the food like wellness, solid gold, blue, evo taste of the wild




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