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lab biting - somewhat


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#1 diego

 

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        Posted 15 October 2007 - 09:23 PM

Hello all - my first post. I adopted an 8 month old black lab from a local shelter. He tends to mouth my hands - he doesn't bite down but the teeth mouthing our hands and arms hurt. I've searched the board and found some tactics - what have you guys tried w/ sucess? Thanks

#2 Heather

 

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        Posted 16 October 2007 - 01:49 PM

Every single time, clamp your hands around his mouth and sternly in a deep voice say NOO biting.. or something to that effect. Worked for me.. all three of my dogs.. (working on it with the puppy.. but.. she'll eventually get it.. it does take a while.. like with kids.. repetition repetition.. wish there was some magic spray I could sell you .. but like with everything in life.. it takes work.. Good luck, Heather smile.gif
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#3 mica

 

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        Posted 07 November 2007 - 02:09 PM

QUOTE (diego @ Oct 16 2007, 02:23 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hello all - my first post. I adopted an 8 month old black lab from a local shelter. He tends to mouth my hands - he doesn't bite down but the teeth mouthing our hands and arms hurt. I've searched the board and found some tactics - what have you guys tried w/ sucess? Thanks


is he just mouthing or biting? Lab are retrievers and as such do tend to be mouhty, it sounds as if a stern "NO" from you may do the trick instead of the more agressive grabbing of his mouth in return. he just needs to be taught some bite inhibition if all he is doing is gentle mouthing. Dallas my youngest, will walk quietly holding our hands without pressure
it is one of life's unchangable laws.. that all friendly dogs have dirty paws

#4 proline

 

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        Posted 07 November 2007 - 09:29 PM

I'm with Heather on this one!! Don't worry with time it goes away!! Welcome and congrat's to you for adding a Black Lab smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif to your family!!!

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#5 ryanj

 

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        Posted 13 February 2008 - 07:45 PM

We recently brought home a black lab and he does nothing but bite. He is now 10 weeks old and still biting. Funny thing is, when he goes for your ears he is VERY gentle. I don't get it.
We have tried saying "NO!" and giving him a toy, spraying Apple Bitters on our hands (he loves that stuff by the way) and I have flicked his rear end with my finger a few times. We also tried to leave the room, and to "yep" like a hurt pup when he clamps down. Getting fustrated.
Everyone keeps saying oh, he's just a puppy and that's what they do. HA HA I look like a blackberry harvester.

Ryan

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#6 kailey

 

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        Posted 14 February 2008 - 10:20 AM

what worked for me is everytime the dog bites somewhat hard....if it hurts YELP! loud enough to distract them and theyll over time stop, thats how other dogs tell them there biting to hard.it worked with 2 of my dogs.or just saying nooo works too.

#7 Storm'smom

 

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        Posted 19 February 2008 - 04:05 PM

QUOTE (ryanj @ Feb 13 2008, 08:45 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We recently brought home a black lab and he does nothing but bite. He is now 10 weeks old and still biting. Funny thing is, when he goes for your ears he is VERY gentle. I don't get it.
We have tried saying "NO!" and giving him a toy, spraying Apple Bitters on our hands (he loves that stuff by the way) and I have flicked his rear end with my finger a few times. We also tried to leave the room, and to "yep" like a hurt pup when he clamps down. Getting fustrated.
Everyone keeps saying oh, he's just a puppy and that's what they do. HA HA I look like a blackberry harvester.

Ryan

Storm, at 9 months, still bites a little, but we've always grabbed her mouth, shut it and said no or substituted something that she is allowed to bite like a toy or a bone immediately. We noticed that she bites more when she's tired and is ready for a nap in her crate. So, of course, that's where she goes. I've also incorporated lots of bone chewing time into her schedule. About once a week I'll get her a new roasted bone with the fat hanging off it. She gets it outside until it's all cleaned off and then she can bring it inside where I will stuff it with treats very tightly to keep her busy for at least 20 minutes. Apparently, this type of dog needs a lot of biting activity....so, since that's the way things are, we supply something she is allowed to bite, often. I never use rawhide because of fear of getting it stuck in the intestines, but there are so few things that can stand up to her chewing that I am often tempted to buy one. However, I've gotten to be an expert bone/treat stuffer.......and that is the best cure for her.

#8 Casa Rosie

 

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        Posted 20 February 2008 - 04:29 PM

This is heartening.

We got our new addition 5 days ago - she's 2 months old (8 weeks on Saturday), and she's "really bitey" as I've been telling everyone. Like a tasmanian devil! Sometimes when we play she gets so worked up and comes snapping at me from all directions. People say it's ok, she's just a pup, but this is not going to be cute for long. I too am starting to look like a blackberry harvester. Hilarious!

I try to grab her mouth and shut it and say NO! My new method is to yelp and pull my hand away, or just ignore her. It just seems to get her more riled up. I don't want to hurt her, but others have told me to grab her by the scruff of her neck and growl. She thinks this is a game too. She's very sweet and cheery, my Rosie, but not getting the message.

I am a bit at sea here - I've never had a puppy before. I feel a bit desperate, not ever knowing if I'm doing the right thing. I don't want to damage her, but I also don't want to have a dog that bites. I thought I picked the shy one....

#9 mica

 

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        Posted 22 February 2008 - 04:00 AM

lol Rosie.. they say watch out for the quiet ones!
ok you really need to stop that mouthy behaviour NOW.. don't pay attention to anyone who says ahhh it's just what puppies do and it will soon stop.. no it will ONLY stop when YOU stop it! when she does it, grab her by the scruff and growl NO at her, shake a LITTLE if you have to, it does sound like ur wee terror could so easily get out of control.. it's only excitement, but it still has to stop now before she is able to do real damage with her teeth. the key is repetition here, the more she does it, the more forceful you'll have to be, if she's still seeing it as a game then she needs time out, put her in the pen for a cpl of minutes, any longer than that is defeating the whiole issue coz she wont know WHY she's in there,, so igf scruffing doesnt work, put her in the pen, turn ur back, she'll soon get the message, wait a cpl of minutes, let her out of the pen to resume playing.
she sounds like my type of puppy, bouncy and full of attitude. lol.
it is one of life's unchangable laws.. that all friendly dogs have dirty paws

#10 Casa Rosie

 

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        Posted 22 February 2008 - 10:24 AM

QUOTE (mica @ Feb 22 2008, 04:00 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
lol Rosie.. they say watch out for the quiet ones!
ok you really need to stop that mouthy behaviour NOW.. don't pay attention to anyone who says ahhh it's just what puppies do and it will soon stop.. no it will ONLY stop when YOU stop it! when she does it, grab her by the scruff and growl NO at her, shake a LITTLE if you have to, it does sound like ur wee terror could so easily get out of control.. it's only excitement, but it still has to stop now before she is able to do real damage with her teeth. the key is repetition here, the more she does it, the more forceful you'll have to be, if she's still seeing it as a game then she needs time out, put her in the pen for a cpl of minutes, any longer than that is defeating the whiole issue coz she wont know WHY she's in there,, so igf scruffing doesnt work, put her in the pen, turn ur back, she'll soon get the message, wait a cpl of minutes, let her out of the pen to resume playing.
she sounds like my type of puppy, bouncy and full of attitude. lol.


Well we had our first strange houseguest over last night and it did not go well. Rosie became a biting maniac. It was like we too 5 steps backwards, because I was just starting to feel like she was getting the point of our training. I gave her time-outs, but I don't think she understood why. I had to! She was starting to ruin our guest's clothes! Also he was not really reacting very well, kind of teasing her a bit or not being assertive enough. It was a tough night. I think she was trying to get our undivided attention, plus we couldn't 'play her out' as we have been doing.

This morning she was a little angel again, easily distracted by her toys and her nylabone. i find the bait and switch method is working a bit. I do 'scruff' her but she seems to find it funny.

The cat seems to have developed a good method (she harrasses one cat, not the other). He grabbed her head with two paws this morning and pinned her face to the ground, so she wriggled around but couldn't escape. She got up humbled when he released her. Now let's she if she remembers...

#11 Zeus

 

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        Posted 24 February 2008 - 07:50 PM

My dog is 9 weeks and loves biting when he is excited and playful. I do the two finger close and say No. He does a jerk reaction, does one yap at you and then quickly turns his head or runs. He's such a teenager.

Usually when im tickling him and playing with him he looks at me and tries to do a bite but i just gently keep saying no and he mouths my hand then lets go. Other times though, it turns into a game for him.

I think I will try being more forceful and saying No in a growly voice.

#12 plaes

 

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        Posted 27 February 2008 - 07:44 AM

you can hit his chin from underneath. you can also walk away.

i prefer putting his lips inside so he feels discomfort when he clamps down. hands are not chew toys! i win!

#13 mica

 

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        Posted 29 February 2008 - 09:07 AM

I'm not sure hitting the pup's chin form underneath is a good idea.. but definihtely yes to pushing the lips inside so pup is biting him/herself.. that works. It's hard for new puppy owners to get a hold of a naughty pups mouth and squeeze.
it is one of life's unchangable laws.. that all friendly dogs have dirty paws

#14 mica

 

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        Posted 29 February 2008 - 09:09 AM

When I bought Madison all those years ago, she was a real witch, biting to get attention, her breeder suggested I turn my back on her and she'll stop biting.. did that work.. hell no!! she just jumped up and bit my shoulder. sometimes even the books get it wrong, I had to be VERY forceful with Madison, even now at 7 years old, she knows how to get her own way. But I wouldnt change her for the world.. hmmmmp
it is one of life's unchangable laws.. that all friendly dogs have dirty paws

#15 ali0528

 

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        Posted 04 March 2008 - 04:30 PM

QUOTE (Casa Rosie @ Feb 20 2008, 04:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This is heartening.

We got our new addition 5 days ago - she's 2 months old (8 weeks on Saturday), and she's "really bitey" as I've been telling everyone. Like a tasmanian devil! Sometimes when we play she gets so worked up and comes snapping at me from all directions. People say it's ok, she's just a pup, but this is not going to be cute for long. I too am starting to look like a blackberry harvester. Hilarious!

I try to grab her mouth and shut it and say NO! My new method is to yelp and pull my hand away, or just ignore her. It just seems to get her more riled up. I don't want to hurt her, but others have told me to grab her by the scruff of her neck and growl. She thinks this is a game too. She's very sweet and cheery, my Rosie, but not getting the message.

I am a bit at sea here - I've never had a puppy before. I feel a bit desperate, not ever knowing if I'm doing the right thing. I don't want to damage her, but I also don't want to have a dog that bites. I thought I picked the shy one....


This sounds just like my Grommet. She thinks it is a game. I love the tasmanian devil comparisson, when she gets worked up she is just like that.
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#16 suzanne & harley

 

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        Posted 04 March 2008 - 04:40 PM

I don't think it as much a case of "the books getting it wrong" as it is a case of
every dog is an individual and what works with one dog may not work with the next dog.

My previous dog Ajax was a lot more head strong (part chow) turning my back on him would
never get him to stop. He was determined and would try all that much harder to get your attention again.
He had drive and if I had been more into training back then I would have known what a gem that is
for training tough stuff like searching. He would never give up. I loved him to bits but I didn't help him
live up to his potential. He could have done so much more.

Harley however is what they call a "soft" dog. Turning my back on her and yelping to let her know
it hurt worked on her like magic. She is my little angel but her drive is not as strong. When the ball goes into
the tall grass she takes a step back and keeps looking to me to come find it for her.
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But I can do all I know how to make a world of difference for for this dog




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