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Can I feed my lab baby carrots


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#1 Benjamin

 

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        Posted 07 October 2006 - 08:26 AM

My Lab loves to eat baby carrots and I wonder is this okay!! because I know grapes are not okay since they can get stuck in their small intestines!
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#2 David

 

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        Posted 19 October 2006 - 04:21 PM

Carrots are not harmless to dogs, at the same time have no nutrional value. Carrots are not processed by dogs. However, its just as good as any other treat for training.

#3 Benjamin

 

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        Posted 21 October 2006 - 10:18 AM

QUOTE (Benjamin @ Oct 7 2006, 01:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My Lab loves to eat baby carrots and I wonder is this okay!! because I know grapes are not okay since they can get stuck in their small intestines!


hey Dave ,

Thanks for posting on the new boards...... How's Rocky doing?????He is getting big!!!!!

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#4 suzanne & harley

 

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        Posted 10 November 2006 - 01:07 AM

QUOTE (David @ Oct 19 2006, 05:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Carrots are not harmless to dogs, at the same time have no nutrional value. Carrots are not processed by dogs. However, its just as good as any other treat for training.


Not harmless? Or did you mean to say not harmful?
Not being critical. Just not sure what you meant.
Harley also likes an occasional baby carrot and I don't want to give them to her if they are not harmless!
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#5 David

 

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        Posted 10 November 2006 - 08:35 AM

sorry meant harmful




QUOTE (Benjamin @ Oct 21 2006, 10:18 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
hey Dave ,

Thanks for posting on the new boards...... How's Rocky doing?????He is getting big!!!!!



Hey Ron

Yeah he is he is 80 lbs and just recently turned 1


hows your gang doing?

#6 Carolyne

 

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        Posted 10 November 2006 - 11:27 AM

Carrots is one of the few veggies Tess won't eat. That and cauliflower. The tinned food she has each night has veggies in it and when she's done, I'll notice that every last scrap is gone except the carrots!! Clever! biggrin.gif
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#7 daly_pr

 

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        Posted 10 November 2006 - 02:41 PM

Hey,

We give to Lady Lolah carrots and she likes them, also she had try bananas (she completly loves bananas) wink.gif and pear but the pears gave her some gases dry.gif . Some vegetables are good for them just be sure that they wont harm you puppy.

QUOTE (Carolyne @ Nov 10 2006, 11:27 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Carrots is one of the few veggies Tess won't eat. That and cauliflower. The tinned food she has each night has veggies in it and when she's done, I'll notice that every last scrap is gone except the carrots!! Clever! biggrin.gif



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#8 Carolyne

 

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        Posted 10 November 2006 - 02:55 PM

Thank you Daly. After a few attempts and Karens help it fiannly worked!

I've been told not to give a dog bananas as it makes them ill but I guess each owner knows what their pet will and will not do/eat/drink etc.
I've been told not to give Tessa onion but she adores them and I have never notice any effect after she's had them. Bizarre rolleyes.gif
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#9 KarenM

 

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        Posted 10 November 2006 - 04:09 PM

My Toby loves canned pumpkin. He eats it like it was Ice Cream. We give ours apples almost every day and also a snip it of bananas sometimes.
They do not like carrots and from the last site someone said that are mostly sugar, and can make them fat fat fat.



QUOTE (Carolyne @ Nov 10 2006, 02:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thank you Daly. After a few attempts and Karens help it fiannly worked!

I've been told not to give a dog bananas as it makes them ill but I guess each owner knows what their pet will and will not do/eat/drink etc.
I've been told not to give Tessa onion but she adores them and I have never notice any effect after she's had them. Bizarre rolleyes.gif

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#10 Carey

 

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        Posted 10 November 2006 - 06:08 PM

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We feed benson bananas and he likes them if he can get them to stay in his mouth! They are slippery! And we've caught him stealing apples off the counter top......he rarely will eat the whole apple unless u cut it up though......and my my my....get a towel cause here comes the drool! He will also eat a few baby carots....not very fond of them. His very very favorite is PEACHES! He eats them up and is so ready for another bite!




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#11 Carolyne

 

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        Posted 11 November 2006 - 03:07 PM

There are some healthy dogs around.. you know that the doctors say about 5 fruit and veg a day!
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#12 Rileys Mom

 

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        Posted 12 November 2006 - 06:35 PM

We give Riley any veggies or fruits (except onions and grapes) he absolutly loves bananas and cantalope. I also tried the canned pumpkin with him and he would just lick the spoon until it was clean! (Thanks for the tip) He will also munches on carrots and will munch on celery but after he is finished we usually find the remains on the floor.
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        Posted 13 November 2006 - 09:04 AM

[i][color=#CC33CC]Broque loves all sorts of veggies and fruits. When I am cooking or getting a snack he always drools. I have found that he doesn't like pickles though. Are there any other foods besides grapes that I ABSOLUTLY should NOT feed him? I had never heard of the grapes being bad and you can believe he won't be getting those again.
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#14 lindaa

 

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        Posted 16 November 2006 - 02:45 PM

QUOTE (Trust @ Nov 13 2006, 02:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
[i][color=#CC33CC]Broque loves all sorts of veggies and fruits. When I am cooking or getting a snack he always drools. I have found that he doesn't like pickles though. Are there any other foods besides grapes that I ABSOLUTLY should NOT feed him? I had never heard of the grapes being bad and you can believe he won't be getting those again.


There was a forum on this on the old site. I can add that garlic, onions, chocolate (especially dark), and alcohol are harmful. A lot of dog food manufacturers include garlic in their recipes. I alway check various treats I buy for that ingredient. The best are homemade. At least you know what you put in them.
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#15 pam

 

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        Posted 18 November 2006 - 12:32 PM

Surely there is a difference between garlic used sparingly as a flavouring and eating a bunch of cloves? Heavens, just two days ago Griffin ate a half a box of kleenex (first he at half the kleenex, then he ate half the box!)

I think a lot of the toxicity warnings are when a dog wolfs down tremendous quantities. A grape here or there is not going to cause life-threatening diarrhea, but a basket of grapes where a dog can reach them could have disastrous consequences.

Kleenex, apparently, has no ill effect rolleyes.gif
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#16 Heather

 

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        Posted 27 November 2006 - 06:57 PM

Found this online.. it is all true. I verified it at snopes.com
Just some food for thought.. figured I'd pass it along to other dog lovers.. I never knew grapes and raisins could kill a dog..

Feeding pets food that we enjoy is not only wrong, it can also be fatal. There are some foodstuffs that humans relish which cause illness and death if eaten by pets.

Chocolate, macadamia nuts and onions are good examples. Each of these foods contains chemicals which rarely cause problems for humans, but for dogs, these same chemicals can be deadly.

Chocolate toxicity
Onion and garlic poisoning
The danger of macadamia nuts
Other potential dangers
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Chocolate toxicity Top
Chocolate contains theobromine, a compound that is a cardiac stimulant and a diuretic.

When affected by an overdose of chocolate, a dog can become excited and hyperactive. Due to the diuretic effect, it may pass large volumes of urine and it will be unusually thirsty. Vomiting and diarrhoea are also common. The effect of theobromine on the heart is the most dangerous effect. Theobromine will either increase the dog's heart rate or may cause the heart to beat irregularly. Death is quite possible, especially with exercise.

After their pet has eaten a large quantity of chocolate, many pet owners assume their pet is unaffected. However, the signs of sickness may not be seen for several hours, with death following within twenty-four hours.

Cocoa powder and cooking chocolate are the most toxic forms. A 10-kilogram dog can be seriously affected if it eats a quarter of a 250gm packet of cocoa powder or half of a 250gm block of cooking chocolate. These forms of chocolate contain ten times more theobromine than milk chocolate. Thus, a chocolate mud cake could be a real health risk for a small dog. Even licking a substantial part of the chocolate icing from a cake can make a dog unwell.

Semi-sweet chocolate and dark chocolate are the next most dangerous forms, with milk chocolate being the least dangerous. A dog needs to eat more than a 250gm block of milk chocolate to be affected. Obviously, the smaller the dog, the less it needs to eat.


Onion and garlic poisoning Top
Onions and garlic are other dangerous food ingredients that cause sickness in dogs, cats and also livestock. Onions and garlic contain the toxic ingredient thiosulphate. Onions are more of a danger.

Pets affected by onion toxicity will develop haemolytic anaemia, where the pet's red blood cells burst while circulating in its body.

At first, pets affected by onion poisoning show gastroenteritis with vomiting and diarrhoea. They will show no interest in food and will be dull and weak. The red pigment from the burst blood cells appears in an affected animal's urine and it becomes breathless. The breathlessness occurs because the red blood cells that carry oxygen through the body are reduced in number.

The poisoning occurs a few days after the pet has eaten the onion. All forms of onion can be a problem including dehydrated onions, raw onions, cooked onions and table scraps containing cooked onions and/or garlic. Left over pizza, Chinese dishes and commercial baby food containing onion, sometimes fed as a supplement to young pets, can cause illness.

Onion poisoning can occur with a single ingestion of large quantities or with repeated meals containing small amounts of onion. A single meal of 600 to 800 grams of raw onion can be dangerous whereas a ten-kilogram dog, fed 150 grams of onion for several days, is also likely to develop anaemia. The condition improves once the dog is prevented from eating any further onion

While garlic also contains the toxic ingredient thiosulphate, it seems that garlic is less toxic and large amounts would need to be eaten to cause illness.


The danger of macadamia nuts Top
Macadamia nuts are another concern. A recent paper written by Dr. Ross McKenzie, a Veterinary Pathologist with the Department of Primary Industries, points to the danger of raw and roasted macadamia nuts for pets.

The toxic compound is unknown but the affect of macadamia nuts is to cause locomotory difficulties. Dogs develop a tremor of the skeletal muscles, and weakness or paralysis of the hindquarters. Affected dogs are often unable to rise and are distressed, usually panting. Some affected dogs have swollen limbs and show pain when the limbs are manipulated.

Dogs have been affected by eating as few as six macadamia kernels (nuts without the shell) while others had eaten approximately forty kernels. Some dogs had also been given macadamia butter.

Luckily, the muscle weakness, while painful, seems to be of short duration and all dogs recovered from the toxicity. All dogs were taken to their veterinary surgeon.

Pets owners should not assume that human food is always safe for pets. When it comes to chocolate, onions, garlic and macadamia nuts, such foods should be given in only small quantities, or not at all. Be sure that your pets can't get into your stash of chocolates, that food scraps are disposed of carefully to prevent onion and garlic toxicity and that your dog is prevented from picking up macadamia nuts if you have a tree in your garden.



Other potential dangers Top
Pear pips, the kernels of plums, peaches and apricots, apple core pips (contain cyanogenic glycosides resulting in cyanide posioning)
Potato peelings and green looking potatoes
Rhubarb leaves
Mouldy/spoiled foods
Alcohol
Yeast dough
Coffee grounds, beans & tea (caffeine)
Hops (used in home brewing)
Tomato leaves & stems (green parts)
Broccoli (in large amounts)
Raisins and grapes
Cigarettes, tobacco, cigars
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#17 daly_pr

 

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        Posted 27 November 2006 - 08:50 PM

QUOTE (Heather @ Nov 27 2006, 06:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Found this online.. it is all true. I verified it at snopes.com


Heather

Thanks for sharing this information with us!

Im sure this will help a lot to all the users of this site smile.gif
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#18 violent_storm2000

 

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        Posted 28 November 2006 - 06:22 AM

Heather is correct about the chocolate. It is bad for dogs. But will your 80 to 100 pound lab die because he ate a hersheys kiss no. Remember it goes by the size of the dog as to how much will hurt them. For normal milk chocolate (44 mg of theobromine/oz) it is about one oz of chocolate per one pound of body weight or . At thoes levels for your 80 pound lab you would need about 80 oz of milk chocolate. That much chocolate in one serving would not be good for a human either. Semi sweet chocolate (150mg/oz) is roughly one oz of chocolate per 3 pounds of body weight, so the LD 50 for an 80 pound dog would be about 26oz. Bakers chocolate (390mg/oz) is the worst at one oz per 9 pounds of body weight, LD 50 in a 80 pound dog almost 9 OZ. For toxicity levels check out http://www.talktothe...colatetoxic.HTM
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#19 daly_pr

 

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        Posted 28 November 2006 - 09:00 AM

QUOTE (violent_storm2000 @ Nov 28 2006, 06:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
But will your 80 to 100 pound lab die because he ate a hersheys kiss no. Remember it goes by the size of the dog as to how much will hurt them.


Matt
I understand what you said.
And completly agree with that just to put an example:

GARLIC is harmful for dogs but I switch Lady Lolah to a Large Breed Puppy Food from Royal Canin as my veterinary recommended and in the label this food says it has GARLIC!!!

And out there are a lot of Large Breed food that have garlic in the ingredients!!

So I think is the amount that you give them that can be harmful dry.gif
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#20 violent_storm2000

 

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        Posted 28 November 2006 - 04:49 PM

Exactly daly. Not only are dogs omnivores they are the garbage disposals of the animal world. Remember most of the things that are supposed to be bad for dogs are good in moderation. I am not telling you to feed your dog something that you think is bad for it. Just do not get caught up in alot of hype.
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