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Ear Infection?


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#1 andrewsme

 

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        Posted 03 November 2008 - 10:46 PM

My 6 month old lab is shaking his head, walking with his head tilted, and scratching his ear badly.  He vomitted and wouldn't eat much starting last Wed., but he was better by Friday afternoon.  Right back to jumping, running, chewing, playing with evertything and anything!  Now his ear (only on one side) is full of blackish yellow goop and he freaks out when I try to clean it.  I called the vet last week and she said wait it out to see if he gets any better and he did.  But this ear stuff just started tonight.  I gave him a bath about a week and a half ago and ever since then he has had been shaking his head like he may have water in it.  So I cleaned his ears last week and both were fine (only a little dirt in them).  Tonight though his one ear is full of stuff and he definitely doesn't like it when I try to clean some of it out.  

I am a first time mom of a lab (not of dogs) and I just want to know if anyone else has had this problem.  I am calling the vet tomorrow morning to see if I can take him in.  This is our first problem with him being "sick".  Other than this is, he is your normal, hyper, happy lab!!

#2 Kurt

 

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        Posted 04 November 2008 - 11:13 PM

Sounds like you got water in your dogs ear and this has developed into a yeast infection. It's pretty gross (lots of brown, black debris and it stinks to high heaven!). It's usually cured by several rinses a day with a ear product called Epti-Otic (availabe from your vet) and antibiotic cream. These infections can take up to a week or more to get rid of, so just be patient and continue with the treatment until everything is fine.
We always dry out our dogs ears with 100% cotton balls or soft tissues. Since we have been doing that after a bath or swimming we haven't seen any more ear infections.

#3 andrewsme

 

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        Posted 05 November 2008 - 05:35 PM

Thanks Kurt for the reply! I took Ozzy to the vet yesterday and that's exactly what is wrong with him! From the yeast infection in his ear to the drops! Everything is the same! So now, we are on a 10 day treatment plan and hopefully it will help! This was the only time I didn't thourghly dry out Oz's ears and now both of us are paying for it! I have now learned my lesson!!!



#4 Kurt

 

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        Posted 10 November 2008 - 01:37 PM

You are welcome. As a preventive I would use the wash out solution before each bath to clean the ears. That's what we do.
These yeast infections develop rather rapidly. I am glad you were able to jump on it right away. Ear infections sometimes can be a bear to get rid of.

#5 LILHARLEYYYY

 

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        Posted 19 December 2008 - 08:15 PM

My guy Spike Dog gets ear infections and always has. The Vet said it was allergies and it is common in Labs. He gave us medicine to use when he does get them. We try and keep his ears as clean as possible, but he gets that gunk in them too.

#6 pamom

 

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        Posted 23 January 2009 - 10:04 PM

there is a home remedy you can use to treat ear troubles. I have known many people that swear by this. This can be used as a preventative also.

Blue Powder Ear Treatment

INGREDIENTS:

16 Oz. Isopropyl Alcohol (60 percent)
4 Tablespoons Boric Acid Powder
16 Drops Gentian Violet Solution 1%


Mix together in alcohol bottle and shake well.

You will also need to shake solution every time you use it to disperse the Boric Acid Powder.
To use, purchase the "Clairol" type plastic bottle or a small baby ear syringe bottle to dispense solution to affected ears.

TREATMENT: Evaluate condition of ears before treating and if very inflamed and sore do not attempt to pull hair or clean out ear at all.

Wait until inflammation has subsided which will be about 2 days.

Shake the bottle each time before using.

Put cotton balls or similar absorbent material under their ear.

Flood the ear with solution, (gently squirt bottle), massage gently to the count of 60,
wipe with a tissue.

Flood again on first treatment, wipe with a tissue,and leave alone without massage.
The dog will shake out the excess which can be wiped with a tissue, cotton ball, etc
as the Gentian Violet does stain fabrics.

#7 blackdogy

 

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        Posted 07 February 2011 - 07:03 PM

Dont use alchohol it can sting your dogs ear . First off start giving a tablespoon of yogurt each day with food the bacteria in the yogurt help to eat up some of the yeast enzymes in the food so your dogs body has some help with it. The second thing is get a good ear treatment we use Dr.DOgs ear oil. It works the best for us. Read about it for yourself good luck here is the site http://www.drdogs247.com you can google about the yogurt and yeast to read more also

#8 Kurt

 

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        Posted 08 February 2011 - 05:01 AM

Yikes! Putting a 60% alcohol solution in any dogs ear would guarantee a definite reaction from your dog, and not a good one I would say! The recommendation for the Blue Powder Ear treatment said to wait until the inflammation declines before using it. But how are you going to do that? You have to treat the ears first...

True, some dogs can have ear infections from allergies, but I most often see yeast infections. Much more common. Because our labs have flappy ears, air can't get in there to circulate properly and that's what contributes to these infections.


Also, the shape of the ear canal can tend to foster more infections that others. Our Black Lab Buddy has this strange little canal in it that's kind of buried under a skin fold. You have to bend it forward slightly to get in there to dry the area out. If he does get an infection, that's the first place it starts.

#9 Kurt

 

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        Posted 26 June 2015 - 01:04 PM

Since this thread was originally started I have researched the subject and learned quite a bit.

 

As stated in a thread above, ear infections can be an indication of an allergy to something else. Two of our labs kept coming down with these infections and just as soon as you would clear them up, they'd start up again. Our vet would tell us over and over again it was moisture in the ears that is the cause. But why weren't our other two dogs coming down with it.

 

 So we went to an allergist and we tried different foods on the two affected dogs and was able to determine that both of them had an allergy to corn in their food. We switched to a grain free dog food and the allergies went away, never to return again. And  the two dogs that have this allergy are from two separate liters and not even closely related. It's just a common allergy in labs.

 

This may be something you might want to look into if you have a lab with a lot of ear infections.



#10 Kurt

 

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        Posted 08 July 2015 - 05:27 PM

I discussed this ear problem with our vet and she warned that if your dog has a ear infection such as yeast and is left untreated the existing infection can develop into a staph or strep infection. That's when it really becomes a problem for a dog. And if that is left untreated the infection may leave the ear canal and infect the inside of the dogs skull. So promptly treating ear infections and having a preventative plan sounds like the way to go.






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