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Lab wetting 5 year old


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#1 VampD3

 

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        Posted 14 July 2015 - 06:49 AM

Hey guys

I hope you can help. I have a 5 year old lab male. Castrated.

For last 6 months or so he has been dribbling and it's getting worse. We thought it was our older dog But since she passed away we discovered it's not.

It's not just when he sleeps. He was sitting in Sun and just stood up and moved and licked and when I looked i saw he had dribbled again.

It's also not when he needs a wee as we have let him out and it still happens so not when he needs to go either.

He been to vets and did bloods which are fine and wee sample is fine, they are seeing if bacteria grows to mean infection but waiting a few days for results.

But with it going on for at least 6 months i doubt it can be infection can it? He also tender on his back end as he turns his head when you stroke that area. Doesn't cry out though. But he has always turned his head.

Please any advice? I am concerned. He dribbles a lot and I am washing his bedding and covers a lot

Deborah

#2 Kurt

 

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        Posted 16 July 2015 - 03:06 PM

It could be a kidney or infection of the urinary system somewhere. Bladder, ureters and kidneys are all suspect.

 

How much is he dribbling each time? A few drops, a squirt or two? A teacup full?

 

I either would have a discussion with my vet about this for a better prognosis or possibly visit with another veterinarian. Your dog may not feel comfortable with this and may even have a fever. How long has it been since your dog has been neutered? If it's recently sometimes a botched neutering job can cause this. If he's been neutered for over a year, then that's not it.

 

Your vet may want to proactively do an x-ray or CT scan to make sure there is no physiology that may be causing this problem.

 

>Kurt



#3 VampD3

 

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        Posted 20 July 2015 - 10:05 AM

Hi Kurt

He has been neutered at 1 year old and is now 5.

It's normally a few drips each time but was getting worse.

His bound and urine samples came back normal so he is booked for ultrasound scan on Thursday.

In mean time he was given incontenance medication which seems to be working so far.

If ultrasound is normal then I don't know why he has suddenly developed it or why he is tender on back end?
Deborah

#4 Kurt

 

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        Posted 20 July 2015 - 11:54 AM

This is a tough one. The next step would be an ultra sound or X-Ray to see if there is anything inside the dog that could be pressing on the parts of the urinary system that would cause the leakage and tenderness. I am glad to hear that the anti-continence meds are working for you. I would press the vet to get these tests done quickly. You'll want to find out what is causing this soon. Sometimes quite a bit of testing needs to be done to feret out a dog's health problems.

 

Additionally, it could be the start of a hip problem too. You mentioned in your first post that you noticed this when your dog gets up. I assume this is moving to a standing or sitting position from laying down? Does the dog seem tender on the backside down by his hips?

 

The dog may receive a sharp bolt of pain from the hips that triggers a squirt or two. Your dog is getting to be of an age where this can start to happen. I would keep the dogs exercise to a minimum and see if you notice any improvement. Fortunately there is quite a bit a veterinarian can do these days to preserve the hips without having to do a hip replacement, which is pretty common in dogs these days. An X-ray of the hips would rule out this condition.

 

 

Please do let us know what the vet finds out.

 

Kurt






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